Why Your Company Needs More Comedy

In a world full of notifications, overwork and mental health issues maybe we all need to hang out and laugh more? My new project is bringing comedy to companies.

 “An   icebreaker   is a special-purpose ship or boat designed to move and navigate through ice-covered waters, and provide safe waterways for other boats and ships.” —  Wikipedia

“An icebreaker is a special-purpose ship or boat designed to move and navigate through ice-covered waters, and provide safe waterways for other boats and ships.” — Wikipedia

Who loves an icebreaker?

Nobody really likes doing those stupid icebreaker games do they? I feel like it’s only really the workshop facilitators who get off on those things. Making serious and important businesspeople dance around like well-dressed chickens, clap their soft hands together, and toss imaginary balls of positive energy to each other. I mean COME ON guys! We’re supposed to be serious and important adults.

But. The thing is that they work, basically every time.

They break down the walls of hierarchy and professionalism between the messy humans in the room and force them, for just a few minutes, to play and laugh and forget how serious and important their really definitely serious and important jobs are 😒.

Because guys. The term icebreaker is a metaphor 😉. It’s a good little metaphor actually. Once the huge metal vessel (silly game) has forced its way through the ice (social norms at work) it leaves behind it a safe waterway (light and open atmosphere) for other boats and ships (the next bit of the workshop).

Maybe we don’t need icebreakers though…

I think that people not acting like people gets in the way of doing great work. I’m at my absolute worst at work when I’m playing up to expectations of me, or suppressing important facets of my personality. Icebreakers are just one, well-established, groan-inducing way of forcing people to drop their business facade and be stupid humans together.

Because let’s face it. Everyone’s a bloody stupid human most of the time.We just pretend to be sensible at work because that’s what we think is expected of us. As Jon Barnes says:

It is irrational to assume we are rational and therefore all business decisions premised on the assumption that we are rational, are also irrational and therefore flawed :-)

With all this in mind, I’ve started a new fun project. With my pal Willy, I’m exploring some ways to help people be people by bringing his world (stand-up comedy) and my world (indie business consulting) together. We’re calling it Comedy for Companies 🤘

}